Multimedia

Multimedia


Vital Roads - Epi Island, Vanuatu. Pacific Adaptation to Climate Change (PACC) Project

Dugong in Vanuatu
- This sea creature is a dugong, which we filmed underwater while it fed on sea grass in a remote bay in Vanuatu. Images of dugong set to music.

Overview of the Nguna-Pele Marine Protected Area [Vanuatu]
- This video describes the local creation of a novel marine governance institution in Vanuatu which strengthens local initiatives, but has the ability to deal with larger-scale threats and marine resource challenges.

Saving Nemo - Vanuatu
- Since the success of the film 'Finding Nemo', demand for tropical fish has soared. But the seas of the Pacific are literally being emptied to feed this frenzy. Tropical fish are now virtually worth their weight in gold. "Everybody wants one because of this Nemo film," explains SRS Manager Larry Dacles. His company has a monopoly on tropical fishing in Vanuato, home to some of most popular tropical fish in the world. Former workers claim it got this monopoly by bribing government officials. In just three years, SRS has alienated local tourism operators, who depend on the tropical fish as an attraction, scientists, fear an ecological disaster in the making, and the traditional owners of the reefs. "They take anything and everything," complains one local. "It's out of control." Already there has been a 50% fall in tropical fish from the reefs. Now, it's not so much a case of finding Nemo as saving him.

Sea Turtle Tagging on Nguna and PeleVanuatu
- Describes how sea turtles are caught, tagged and released by the Vanua'Tai monitors on Nguna and Pele islands in Vanuatu.

Vanuatu - Tropical Aquarium Fish Harvest Pt 1 , Pt 2Pt 3
- Vanuatu is a haven for snorkelling, reef and wreck diving, and sport fishing. Since the success of the film 'Finding Nemo', demand for tropical fish has soared. But the seas of the Pacific are literally being emptied to feed this frenzy. Tropical fish are now virtually worth their weight in gold. "Everybody wants one because of this Nemo film," explains SRS Manager Larry Dacles. His company has a monopoly on tropical fishing in Vanuatu, home to some of most popular tropical fish in the world. SRS has alienated local tourism operators, who depend on the tropical fish as an attraction, and the traditional owners of the reefs, and scientists who are fearing an ecological disaster in the making. "They take anything and everything," complains one local. "It's out of control." Already there has been a 50% fall in tropical fish from the reefs. Now, it's not so much a case of finding Nemo as saving him.